Station Buffet | Bridlington

 

Stakeholder Special 23/07/2006

The head board on the Special The scene is set The special arrives on time Heidi Mottram (MD of (Northern Rail) and Paul Salveson Heidi Mottram addresess the guesta Wayne Bardsley receives  a well deserved award The Barber Shop singers entertain the guests The guests dine The guests dine The floral display on the day of the special

Northern Rail ran two special excursion trains on Sunday 23rd July 2006, from Liverpool and Blackpool. The two trains meet at Hull where they joined together and continued to Bridlington.
The aim of the specials was to reward all the volunteers of Community Rail Partnerships, Station adoptee's and Friends of various rail lines for the time and effort that they put in voluntarily to make the rail passengers journeys better.
The work they do makes the railways part of the community, holding events on and around stations, in schools promoting rail safety, bringing life back to stations making them friendlier and brighter, planting flowers, remember the 'old days' when all stations had flowers.

There will be a Community Rail Partnership in your area, why not join and take and active part.

The train was joined at Hull by members of the YCCRP and Dave Walford the local Rail Officer where information packs about the area were given out.
On arrival bang on time at Bridlington the guests over 400 hundred were given a buffet, then after a welcoming speech by Heidi Mottram Northern Rails MD, an award was given to Wayne Bardsley a Northern employee, presented by Martin Brown of Northern Rail. The award was given by the YCCRP under their 'Good Mark of the Month' scheme, for his contribution to Northern Rail and the traveling public. Well done Wayne!!

After the guests had eaten and refreshed coaches and a vintage open topped double decker bus were available for people to go to various places including Sewerby Hall and Gardens, the beach, harbour or the town Centre. We think Heidi Mottram along with her family went paddling but we can't be sure.

Everyone returned on time to the station in time for the return journey all I think agreeing that they had a wonderful day out with many vowing to return to the area, no one missed the train.
With the two service trains that were also at the station at that time over 1,000 passengers went through the station concourse in less than one hour.

Liverpool and Blackpool to Bridlington

Liverpool to Bridlington

Leaving Lime Street we climb through a spectacular rock cutting to Edge Hill, where we join the route of the world's first public passenger railway – the Liverpool and Manchester , designed and built by George Stephenson. Edge Hill station remains a gem and we are working with arts group Metal to make it a showpiece over the next couple of years. The original L&M came in on the right, from its 1830 terminus at Crown Street . Edge Hill was a big railway centre and remains an important junction, where the Crewe line diverges to the right.

We go through another spectacular rock cutting – Olive Mount – before leaving the historic Liverpool and Manchester at Huyton, where we diverge towards St Helens , famous for its glass industry – and Beecham's pills! St Helens Central is being rebuilt through a partnership led by Merseytravel and will provide a superb facility for the town. After St Helens we pass Garswood where a station partnership has recently been formed.

Keeping you all aglow

We run through former mining country and pass the EWS depot at Springs Branch as we join the West Coast Main Line before arriving at Wigan North Western. On leaving, look out for the famous Santus factory on your right, famous for Uncle Joe's Mint Balls!

We climb northwards out of Wigan , passing the new station at Euxton Balshaw
Lane , funded by Lancashire County Council. We stop at Leyland and should pass Special No. 2 going the opposite way towards Manchester ! Give them all a wave…

We leave the West Coast Main Line at Farington Junction and use the normally freight-only line to Lostock Hall, where we join the Preston – Blackburn line. This is classic ‘ Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway' territory from here on to Bradford . Lostock Hall had one of the last steam depots in the UK . Look out for the historic station building at Bamber Bridge , being refurbished with LCC support, and the unusual signalbox controlling the busy level crossing. From here, we climb the steeply graded Hoghton Bank and the scenery becomes more rural.

Arise, Sir Loin!

After passing through Hoghton (we go under a major road bridge) look out for glimpses of the historic Hoghton Tower to your right. This was where King James 1, in 1617, was so impressed by the piece of steak he was served up that he knighted it with the words ‘arise Sir Loin!' – hence the origin of the term ‘sirloin steak'!

The climb eases and we drop down towards Pleasington Golf Course, with tantalising glimpses of the lovely ‘Hoghton Bottoms' – crossed by a high but short viaduct over the River Darwen. Pleasington used to be an idyllic rural station, with a wizened old porter who didn't sell many tickets but told a good tale. The buildings have gone but the trains still stop.

Next station is Cherry Tree, getting into the Blackburn outer suburbs. The Leeds-Liverpool Canal runs cheek by jowl with the railway here. Mill Hill is very different to Cherry Tree and Pleasington. It's emphatically inner urban and multi-cultural. Mill Hill station is within walking distance of Blackburn Rovers FC ground.

Blackburn beckons

The line from Manchester and Bolton joins the line just west of Blackburn , at Bolton Branch Junction. There is a busy rail freight facility here, operated by Gilbraith.

Blackburn station has been recently modernized and is fully staffed. Look out for the mural on Platform 4 showing famous people with Blackburn connections – including the great Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi who visited Blackburn in the 1930s. Blackburn Cathedral is immediately outside station and well worth a visit.

Into East Lancs

The Clitheroe and Hellifield line diverges on the east side of Blackburn at Daisyfield Junction. The line runs through Whitebirk Industrial Estate and passes Rishton reservoir to the left, before arriving in Rishton itself. ‘Rishton Prospects' has recently adopted the station and we look forward to lots of interesting things starting to appear!

Look out for glimpses of Longridge Fell (to your left) as we leave Rishton and pass through the golf course. Before arriving at Church and Oswaldtwistle we go over a high embankment which was once a viaduct – Aspen – before the L&Y filled it in. Church and Oswaldtwistle station has been adopted by nearby Oswaldtwistle Mills and has CCTV monitored from the Mills. A superb example of the business community working with the railway.

The line continues to Accrington which remains a staffed facility (one shift). The former direct ‘main' line to Manchester trailed in on the right, with what was once a V-shaped station with separate platforms for Bury/Manchester.

Accrington Brick

As well as textiles and mining, Accrington was famous for a more unusual industry – brick-making. ‘ Accrington brick' was a by-word for quality in house construction and examples spread right across Lancashire . The heart of brick-making was in the area between Accrington and the next station, Huncoat, where there was a massive brickworks, clays pits and associated industry. No sign of it remains now. The small village also had a colliery and – in more recent times – a power station. All of it is now gone.

There is a manned level crossing at Huncoat – controlled by a classic L&Y signalbox which seems out of scale to what is now required of it. After Huncoat there are more glimpses of the hills and closer views of the Leeds-Liverpool Canal .

A railway community

Hapton is a typical small textile community. In the 1970s it was at the forefront of the campaign to retain the Preston – Colne line and a meeting was held attended by virtually everyone from the village! Beyond Hapton it's hard to avoid the dominant M65, which obliterated all remains of the former locomotive shed at Rose Grove – one of the last three steam depots in Britain , closing on August 5 th 1968 . Rose Grove is still a railway community – even the chip shop has pictures of the loco shed and the bench was rescued from the station when the buildings were cleared!

Rose Grove used to be called ‘Rose Grove for Padiham' – and the small market town lies about a mile north of the station with a frequent bus service. Nearby is Gawthorpe Hall, which houses a famous textile collection. At Rose Grove the former Padiham and Great Harwood line trails in from the north. Until recently the line was used to take coal and oil to the now demolished Padiham Power Station.

Beyond the station lay huge marshalling yards – the ‘Up' and ‘Down' Grids as they were known. The motorway cuts through the northern side (the ‘Down Grid') but you may get a sense of how extensive the yards once were by looking across to your right.

Just beyond Rose Grove the line to Leeds diverges to the right at Gannow Junction. The Colne line continues as a single line through Burnley Central. After a period in the doldrums, the Preston – Colne service is being re-invigorated by the East Lancashire Community Rail Partnership.

We make a brief stop at Burnley Manchester Road – look out for the attractive but overgrown artwork on the left (we want to get these refurbished). After Manchester Road we start climbing Copy Pit Bank, passing Towneley Signalbox (controlling a level crossing) and running through Holme Tunnel. The summit is Copy Pit and we then plunge downwards through dramatic Pennine countryside, over high viaducts and through Kitson Wood Tunnel.

Passing ‘Tod' and into Yorkshire !

We pass Todmorden to the right – the town is served by Manchester – Leeds trains but we only join the route east of ‘Tod' at Hall Royd Junction. Todmorden station is being transformed by a station partnership which involves several community groups and the local wholefood restaurant! The traditional Lancashire-Yorkshire border went right through Todmorden – the middle of the town hall in fact! But it's now very definitely in West Yorkshire . We speed through a series of short tunnels and soon reach Hebden Bridge with its splendid display of planters and hanging baskets, and historic Lancashire and Railway artifacts.

After Hebden Bridge we stop at Mytholmroyd, home of the famous poet Ted Hughes. Just before, we pass through Luddendenfoot, long since closed but the station once had the erratic Branwell Bronte performing clerical duties!

We pass through a short tunnel before arriving at Sowerby Bridge , a fascinating West Riding textile town which is steadily re-inventing itself as a place for good food and good beer! Look out for the slightly scary Wainhouse Tower on the left, built, so legend goes, by a mill owner who had a row with a colleague, or brother, over something or other…was it a lover, was it a business deal? Who knows…

Heading to Bradford and Leeds

We leave the old L&Y main line at Milner Royd Junction (old signalbox on your left) and head up the hill towards Halifax . The newly-reopened line from Brighouse trails in on the right and we pass Eureka ! On the left before arriving at the station. It's a pleasant run from here into Bradford where we reverse. The staff at the station have done a splendid job with hanging baskets and planters at what isn't exactly an architectural prize winner! Bradford , once famous for its woolen trade, is a city on the up, celebrating its multi-cultural diversity but also this year organizing a festival to honour one of its most famous sons, the composer Edward Delius.

It's a tough climb out of Bradford which really taxed drivers and firemen in the age of steam. Hopefully our class 156 will whiz up the climb to Laisterdyke – look back to your left for a fine view of the city. New Pudsey is our next stop, a station recently modernized by West Yorkshire PTE (Metro) to a high standard. We pass through Bramley before entering Leeds , with routes from Huddersfield , Wakefield , Skipton, Harrogate and Normanton joining us outside the station.

Leeds is one of the UK 's busiest stations – if you don't believe us, stand at the barriers at 08.00 on a weekday morning – around 1500 people pass through the gates in five minutes! The station, managed by Network Rail, has had a major refurb and the magnificent 1930s concourse has been restored to its former glory with cafes, shops and a tourist information centre.

To Wakefield and ‘Donny'

We reverse at Leeds and take the Wakefield line past Leeds United's Elland Road Stadium. We climb towards Ardsley, once a thriving railway community but now there's little to see of its past apart from some railway workers' cottages. We shortly arrive at Wakefield Westgate – the town hall's clock tower visible on the left and the less attractive HM Wakefield Prison on your right!

We leave Wakefield on a long viaduct, crossing the old L&Y main line from Manchester and Sowerby Bridge to York , which uses Kirkgate Station. We're on old ‘Great Northern' tracks to Doncaster , home of the GN's famous Doncaster Locomotive Works. This was known as ‘The Plant' which built such famous locos as ‘Flying Scotsman' and ‘Mallard', designed by Sir Nigel Gresley. We reverse again and then head off towards Hull passing the recently closed Hatfield Colliery. We leave the Scunthorpe line at Thorne Junction and head through ‘power station land' towards Goole. Goole was once a major port developed by the railways and still does a fair bit of business. The station has been tastefully modernized and is operated by Northern.

We join the Leeds-Hull line at Gilberdyke and run close to the Humber Estuary towards Hull , with stunning views of the Humber Bridge . We pass through Brough, which built the Barnes-Wallis ‘Lancaster Bomber' during the Second World War. We enter Hull with its magnificent North Eastern Railway terminus – Hull Paragon - and its less than magnificent 1960s tower block which is scheduled for demolition this summer. Hull is a city with a great past and is on the way up. ‘The Deep' is a popular attraction and its Ferens Art Gallery has a national reputation.

Into the Wolds and the Yorkshire Coast !

At Hull we join up with our friends on the Blackpool train and go on a 6-coach convoy to Bridlington. Cottingham is the first station, which has potential for community use of the station buildings. After Cottingham we cross the plains, - look out for the stunning sight of Beverley Minister, ahead on the left. Beverley is a charming market town, home of East Riding Council. The station is a fine example of North Eastern Railway architecture, retaining a splendid overall roof.

Blackpool to Bridlington

It seems funny to be on seaside special leaving Blackpool – but we're on our way to Yorkshire , across the Pennines and Yorkshire Wolds. Wave goodbye to Blackpool Tower – opened in 1894 and having a height of 518'!

We pass Layton and soon arrive at Poulton-le-Fylde, looking better than it has for a long time, thanks to Northern staff and the Poulton and Wyre Rail-Cycle Partnership. They have ambitious plans to develop the old Fleetwood line (on your left as you come in) as a heritage railway. In the meantime they're doing a great job on the station gardens.

We pass Kirkham and run along what used to be a 4-track main line to Preston . Kirkham Signalbox (once ‘Kirkham North Junction') used to handle over 600 trains on its busiest days before the 1939-45 War. We leave the pretty Fylde countryside and enter ‘Proud Preston', passing the imposing St Walburge's church, as we join the West Coast Main Line. Preston is still a very busy station and we pause briefly to pick up guests before carrying on to Leyland and Chorley . We may pass the second special train somewhere round Leyland , so give them a wave!

Wandering Towards Bolton

We leave the ‘main line'; at Euxton Junction and pass through what is the North West 's biggest housing development. A new station – Buckshaw Village – is being planned to cater for the enormous development on the old munitions factory site. Soon after we go through the impressive ‘Flying Arches' at Chorley , a unique feature of railway architecture.

We pick up at Chorley – a bustling market town with a nicely refurbished station, complete with a lovely children's mural in the subway (which you won't be able to see!). We're soon away again, crossing the Leeds-Liverpool canal and speeding through Adlington. We stop to pick up members of ‘Friends of Blackrod Station' at Blackrod – and look out for Rivington Pike in the distance. Below it you'll see the remains of the old Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway's workshops at Horwich.

We pause at Horwich Parkway , a new station with an even newer booking office to cope with all the demand. Bolton Wanderers FC is nearby at the Reebok Stadium. We continue, passing under the charmingly named ‘Bonny Lassie's Bridge' – an iron footbridge linking a nearby farm.

We join the line from Wigan at Lostock and continue towards Bolton – ‘Cottonopolis'; as one writer called it. Few working mills remain but you'll see several of the buildings as we pass through the town, still standing as monuments to an age now past.

It's a fast run from here down to Salford Crescent , through some pleasant open country. When the line opened in 1838 it was compared to the Thames Valley for its beauty!

Manchester Meets Us

At Salford Crescent we head towards Deansgate over the Windsor Link, built in the 1970s. We pass the original Liverpool Road station of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, on our left. This is the world's first passenger station and forms part of the Greater Manchester Museum of Science and Industry. Look out for the canal network around Castlefield as we creep into Deansgate, below the Manchester Metrolink tram system coming in along the old Midland route to what was Manchester Central station – now G-Mex.

Between Deansgate and Piccadilly you'll catch glimpses of the enormous development springing up in the city – especially ‘The Shard' which is taking shape near G-Mex. You can't miss it. Oxford Road is a busy station, with some unique 1960s architecture.

Piccadilly station is a short distance further on – we arrive on Platform 13, on the old ‘MSJ&A' platforms (Manchester South Junction and Altrincham Railway – an early electric service known as ‘Many Short Jerk s - and Away!'). Piccadilly has benefited from a major investment programme and the station bears comparison with the best in Europe .

The Peak District Greets Us

We head out across the network of tracks and head eastwards towards Ashburys past the new TransPennine Express depot – home of the new ‘Pennine' class 185 trains. We diverge at Ashburys heading through Belle Vue and Flowery Field to Romiley – where the Hyde route comes in on our left. The line gets more and more scenic from here, heading out towards the Peak District. Marple Wharf Viaduct, where the Macclesfield Canal parallels the line on an aqueduct, is stunning. We call at Marple then head on through fine scenery past Strines to New Mills Central. The former Hayfield branch went off to the left – you can still see the tunnel portals. Look down to your right and catch a glimpse of the spectacular Torrs and eery disused mills. The town is a delight, with good pubs and eating places and stunning walks.

Generations of Mancunians have used this route to get out to the Peak District and quite a few used the train to take part in the historic Kinder Scout Mass Trespass of 1932, which paved the way for access to the countryside and rights which we now take for granted.

We emerge from New Mills Tunnel to catch a glimpse of the viaduct carrying the main route from Stockport on the right. The line joins us at new Mils South Junction. This part of the route has several traditional Midland Railway signalboxes, including NMS. We climb up to Chinley and leave the old ‘main line' to London St Pancras going off to the right. We plunge into Cowburn Tunnel emerging into the magnificent Hope Valley . The line is promoted by the Hope Valley and High Peak Transport Partnership, many of whose supporters will be joining us at stops along the way.

All the stations along this part of the line – Edale, Hope, Bamford and Hathersage – are ideal starting points for walks into the Peak and each has their own particular delight to tempt the visitor – we'll have literature on board to tell you all about it, including the music trains which run out from Manchester and Sheffield to Edale.

Sheffield Steel – and Supertram

Look out for Earle's Sidings and the busy branch line to the cement works. But keep your eyes open for the splendid scenery above all, before we plunge into Totley Tunnel after Grindleford, with its splendid but quirky station café! We emerge at Totley Tunnel East and soon after pass Dore –which has a good Indian restaurant in the old station buildings. We speed down into Sheffield , with glimpses of Sheffield Supertram on our right.

Sheffield station is being substantially modernized and refurbished, keeping the best of the old. We depart and head out towards Meadowhall, through what was the centre of Sheffield 's steel-making industry. The city was famous above all else for its cutlery, and BR once ran a crack express to Kings Cross called ‘The Master Cutler'.

Meadowhall is one of Europe 's biggest shopping centres and is well served by public transport - it's a great pace for retail therapy. We continue through former steel making territory, past the former Rotherham Masborough station and call at Swinton with its award-winning bus-rail interchange funded by South Yorkshire PTE. We leave the old Midland Main Line at Aldwarke and head towards Mexborough, once a major railway depot, serving the pits and steelworks. The station is in good condition, looked after by Northern staff and station adopters. We pass through Conisborough with its splendid castle on a hill to your right. We'll soon be in Doncaster , South Yorkshire 's railway town par excellence.

Birthplace of ‘The Flying Scotsman'

Doncaster was home to the Great Nothern Railway's famous Doncaster Locomotive Works – known as ‘The Plant' - which built such famous locos as ‘Flying Scotsman' and ‘Mallard', designed by Sir Nigel Gresley in London and North Eastern Railway days. The railway works are still active but no longer build locomotives. We reverse again and then head off towards Hull passing the recently closed Hatfield Colliery. We leave the Scunthorpe line at Thorne Junction and head through ‘power station land' towards Goole. Goole was once a major port developed by the railways and still does a fair bit of business. The station has been tastefully modernized and is operated by Northern.

We join the Leeds-Hull line at Gilberdyke and run close to the Humber Estuary towards Hull , with stunning views of the Humber Bridge . We pass through Brough, which built the Barnes-Wallis ‘Lancaster Bomber' during the Second World War. We enter Hull with its magnificent North Eastern Railway terminus – Hull Paragon - and its less than magnificent 1960s tower block which is scheduled for demolition this summer. Hull is a city with a great past and is on the way up. ‘The Deep' is a popular attraction and its Ferens Art Gallery has a national reputation.

Into the Wolds and the Yorkshire Coast !

At Hull we join up with our friends on the Blackpool train and go on a 6-coach convoy to Bridlington. Cottingham is the first station, which has potential for community use of the station buildings. After Cottingham we cross the plains, - look out for the stunning sight of Beverley Minister, ahead on the left. Beverley is a charming market town, home of East Riding Council. The station is a fine example of North Eastern Railway architecture, retaining a splendid overall roof.

After Beverley, we pas through some charming Wolds villages – Arram, Hutton Cranswick (with its pretty station garden maintained by the local Women's Institute) before arriving at Driffield. The station is much improved, with attractive gardens tended by Northern staff and a very nice pub alongside! The old Driffield Canal comes close to the station – the towpath makes for a nice saunter on a summer's day!

After Driffield we pass through Nafferton before arriving in ‘Brid', a fine, traditional Yorkshire seaside resort. The station is quite amazing, with a fantastic array of hanging baskets and planters, all done by the proprietor and staff of the station buffet. John Sadler, who runs the buffet, is chair of the Yorkshire Coast Community Rail Partnership. The mental health charity MIND, and local artists, use the Old Parcels Office on the station for workshops, meeting rooms and training sessions.

So welcome to Bridlington – there's plenty to see and do and we'll have literature on the train about all the attractions, in Brid itself and out to Sewerby Hall and Flamborough Head.

Have a wonderful time and don't forget to be back at the station for 4.50 at the latest. We depart at 17.05 ( 5.05pm ).

Train Timings

Train 1 (1Z70) Blackpool North to Bridlington

 

Times show outward departure with return time arrival in brackets

 

Blackpool North 08.35 (22.06)

Poulton-le-Fylde 08.41 (21.59)

Preston 09.02 (21.41)

Chorley 09.16 (21.26)

Blackrod 09.22 (21.20)

Lostock 09.27 (21.15)

Bolton 09.32 (21.10)

Salford Crescent 09.44 (20.59)

Manchester Ox. Road 09.50 (20.54)

Manchester Piccadilly (plat. 13) 09.57 (20.50)

Marple 10.13 (20.31)

New Mills Central 10.18 (20.26)

Chinley 10.26 (20.17)

Edale 10.34 (20.09)

Hope 10.43 (20.02)

Sheffield 11.05 (19.34)

Swinton 11.19 (19.10)

Mexborough 11.22 (19.06)

Doncaster 11.34 (18.49)

Goole 11.55 (18.23)

Brough 12.10 (18.06)

Hull 12.45 (17.49)

Beverley 12.57 (17.32)

Driffield 13.09 (17.20)

Bridlington 13.25 (depart back 17.07)

 

Note: the Blackpool and Liverpool trains will couple up at Hull on the outward journey. On the return journey they will stay coupled as far as Doncaster from whence they will go their separate ways

 

Train 2 (1Z71) Liverpool Lime Street to Bridlington

 

Liverpool Lime Street 08.13 (22.30)

Huyton 08.26 (22.18)

St Helens Central 08.35 (22.10)

Wigan North Western 08.49 (21.54)

Leyland 09.02 (21.42)

Blackburn 09.25 (21.22)

Rishton 09.30 (21.16)

Church and O 09.33 (21.13)

Accrington 09.36 (21.11)

Burnley M/cr Road 09.45 (21.02)

Hebden Bridge 10.07 (20.42)

Sowerby Bridge 10.14 (20.36)

Halifax 10.25 (20.29)

Bradford Interchange 10.42 (20.08)

New Pudsey 10.50 (19.54)

Leeds 11.08 (19.43)

Wakefield Westgate 11.24 (19.24)

South Elmsall 11.37 (19.13)

Adwick 11.43 (19.11)

Doncaster 11.53 (18.49)

Goole 12.12 (18.23)

Hull 12.45 (17.49)

Beverley 12.57 (17.32)

Driffield 13.09 (17.19)

Bridlington 13.25 (return 17.07)

We would like to thank all the volunteers, persons and organizations which made this day possible, including
Heidi Mottram (MD Northern Rail)
Stuart Rands (Northern Rail)
The Station Buffet Bridlington
David Walford (Rail Officer)
YCCRP
MIND
The Bridlington Model Railway Society
East Yorkshire County Council
Volunteers too numerous to mention individually and

Northern Rail who made the whole event possible

 

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